Linux alternatives to Windows software

New Variety

Conclusion

Users who are switching from Windows to Linux can expect some work at first. Where only a few programs are typically established for a particular professional purpose on Windows, you will usually find many free applications for different requirements on Linux. There are usually no restrictions, and fees are hardly ever charged.

The main advantage of using Linux is that no one can spy on you on the system, if that is of concern to you. You have complete control over your system and will find yourself part of a social community that also values privacy as a precious commodity. Why wait?

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